Keeping Up in an On-Demand World

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Fostering good relations with business counterparts is a good place to start

It’s a fact that business user expectations of IT continue to grow in today’s tech-heavy consumer culture. In a world where we can get access to new capabilities and services quickly in our personal lives, it’s no wonder that business leaders are seeking the same continuous delivery of new capabilities in their work lives.

Here are five tips that will help you adjust your culture and tooling for this era of on-demand IT.

 

Tip 1: Take notice of the level of collaboration between your company’s business unit managers and the IT department

Ask yourself, is either side pleased with the situation at present? I’ve seen companies invest in roles within IT to foster improved collaboration with the business (e.g. what ITIL calls Service Managers or what Gartner and others call Business Relationship Managers). This is a useful investment for IT organizations to make because it gives a focal point to work with the business, someone who can sit in executive meetings to understand what needs they have and problems they are trying to solve. In a lot of companies the CIO still tries to act as the “relationship manager” for every business unit and sometimes also the head of development tries to do so – these approaches just don’t scale effectively.

 

Tip 2: Do something every quarter to improve communication and collaboration between non-IT managers and the IT department

Standing still in this area means that communication and collaboration is likely eroding. Both the business and IT sides of the house are moving so fast that it requires a proactive communication and collaboration to maintain alignment. I hear a lot of CIOs talk about the need for an “open line of communication” with other departments and that’s a good mindset, but it’s not enough. We have to move beyond appealing to better communications and the need to align with the business. The question you should be asking is “what are some concrete actions I can take now to improve communication and collaboration between non-IT managers and IT?” One idea is the creation of relationship manager roles as mentioned above. Investing in good quality IT relationship managers and aligning up front on project scope is critical.

But even with that in place, challenges for communication and collaboration will persist. For example, if you’re relying on the relationship manager to translate and explain the business needs to those in IT who need to know about what the business is trying to achieve, the priorities, etc. there can be some big communication gaps because not everyone who needs to know gets the information, or, the business needs are changing so rapidly and people in IT are working with outdated information about business requirements. What’s needed is an ongoing dialog between not just the business and IT relationship managers, but also with project managers, developers, and even those in operations that need to deploy and run the applications.

There’s a lot IT can learn here from enterprise collaboration projects in the business (with products like Jive) and apply that to how IT works with the business. Imagine if the people working on the project in IT could “follow” and collaborate on business requirements with the business like you follow someone on Twitter or have a friend on Facebook. Followers could get updated as things change and engage with the business if there are questions or concerns. Maybe the development manager draws a cut line for the release and the business knows about that in advance and can give feedback on features that need to be added or confirm which others can wait. Perhaps there’s a policy that governs an app but operations isn’t aware of it and is going to deploy it in such a way that they would violate the policy – instead the enterprise governance team can know about it and weigh in before the deployment happens.

 

Tip 3: Revisit the tools and approaches you use for IT collaboration work today. Be intentional about your go-forward tools strategy

The challenge I see here (a lot) is that IT is still using the same techniques they’ve always been using for collaboration – meetings, emails, conference calls, sharepoint sites, spreadsheets. There is no substitute for meetings and face-to-face interactions and even conference calls are important, however, the challenge is how do we capture and disseminate that information so those in the meeting can refer back to it but ensure others that weren’t in the meeting can still have access to it? What about someone new joining the organization, how can they get up to speed faster without having to go to lots and lots of meetings?

IT needs a new way to think about how we capture knowledge and make it available to people in the context of the work they’re doing so they don’t have to go hunting for it on sharepoint sites, send out lots of emails, search knowledge bases etc. In effect looking for the needle in the proverbial haystack.

What we need in IT, and which we have been lacking, are cross-team workspaces. An area you could bring together the right people with the right tools and information in a workspace that was defined around the context of the activity that needs to get done – whether that’s a development project, an infrastructure upgrade, an incident that needs to be resolved, etc. And then help facilitate the team making the necessary decisions and documenting the actions that will be taken – while also notifying everyone who needs to know.

 

Tip 4: Accept that complexity is increasing and that your people are key to managing it not just automations

IT environment complexity is a major issue for many companies because their systems have now been linked together so that the user community can move from one system to the next easily and so that data is quickly passed between systems. So now when change comes in it can affect how multiple systems work together. As IT practitioners, we’ve been working so hard to support the business all these years and we now have a collection of lots of legacy stuff and new technologies and it’s all been woven together in a way to help the business as fast as possible.

There’s a lot we’d change if we could go back and do things over, but that’s just not practical, and so for the most part we need to work with the environments we have. The challenge is how do you understand all these integrations, relationships and dependencies, all the tribal knowledge that’s been built up in the IT organization over the years?

There have been several approaches to address this like Configuration Management Databases (CMDBs) and discovery tools, and they help, but they raise their own issues. First, there’s only so much that discovery tools can discover off the wire. They do a decent job of telling you how things are configured and relationships between them but they still miss a lot because they have to be programmed to find “patterns” and there’s no way they can discover things like policies and how those govern your assets.

The other big challenge for discovery tools is that they don’t capture intent – i.e. why things are the way they are. That’s tribal knowledge that’s in your people’s heads. Someone at sometime knew why SAP was configured that way or why a certain port was opened on that server or switch. The problem is that tribal knowledge isn’t well documented, it gets lost as people forget it or leave.

The complexity problem is really a tribal knowledge problem. What we need is a living, breathing CMDB, think of it like a “social CMDB” that leverages discovery tools but then uses crowd-sourcing and peer review, like Wikipedia, to validate what’s been discovered and fill in gaps on an ongoing continuous basis. Until we have this, IT is going to be very resistant to the pace of change the business wants, because we’ll be concerned something might break that we weren’t expecting.

This is another area where you can apply the cross-team workspace concept. The idea of not only capturing the tribal knowledge and continually validating the CMDB but then pushing that information forward in the context of planning a change or resolving an incident. So if people are following the things in the IT environment that they care about, when it comes time to work on a change, the right people can be brought together in a shared workspace (instead of guessing who to involve like in traditional change process management) and arm them with the right information and tools to provide their risk assessment. That way, when the change board goes to review the planned change, they know who’s been involved and what information they had access to and can feel a lot more confident about their decision and approve the change a lot faster to keep the business moving forward.

 

In summary

The fundamental business-IT challenge in a lot of companies is that the business is simply frustrated with the pace at which IT moves. Fostering good relations with business counterparts and investing in relationship managers as mentioned above is a good start. But having the business engaged in a shared workspace for projects they care about, giving them more transparency into the project and decisions being made about cut lines for releases or the like, will give them a greater sense of ownership and appreciation for the work we do in IT and how it’s not just ‘there’s an app for that’ in an on-demand world.

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The ITSM Review are holding a series of seminars this year headed by ITSM superstar Barclay Rae. We will be starting in March with Transforming User Experience – Enterprise Service Management & Self Service. For more information click here

Imprivata Case Study: Why Limit the Service Desk to IT?

Imprivata is a leading provider of authentication and access management solutions for the healthcare industry.

Recall the last time you visited a hospital or medical center, or perhaps watched your favorite medical drama. Health care professionals working in a busy medical environment don’t have time for usernames and passwords to access electronic medical records across multiple IT systems. The preferred security mechanism is a swipe of a badge or simply put your finger down on a biometric reader.

Imprivata provides this authentication and single sign on technology. The same badge tap or fingerprint recognition technology can also allow health care staff to access thousands of systems across the hospital. The bottom line benefit is health care staff spending more time helping patients and less time fiddling with technology.

Imprivata has experienced fast growth over the last year, and Alex Wong, CIO, recently discussed his experiences implementing a “corporate ticketing system” to support the rapidly increasing Imprivata employee count and his overall review of ManageEngine.

Imprivata

Imprivata

  • Founded 2002
  • Headquarters: Lexington, Massachusetts, USA
  • NYSE: IMPR
  • Annual Sales $82.2M USD
  • www.Imprivata.com

 

Alex Wong

Alex Wong

 


Note: ManageEngine commissioned this case study. Thank you to Alex from Imprivata for being so candid and sharing his opinions with the ITSM Review community. Kudos also to ManageEngine for the confidence to allow us to publish Alex’s opinions and review verbatim. The responses below, which I hope you will find to be balanced and honest, have not been edited by ManageEngine or exposed to the usual PR polish.


ITSM Review: Alex, can you explain your strategy for implementing a corporate ticketing system and how this differs from a traditional IT helpdesk?

Alex, Imprivata: We’re growing very fast. One year ago we were 260 staff, we’re now over 350.

When new employees join Imprivata and have issues, they want to know who to contact. We want to make that process easy for them. So we have developed a common platform so that they don’t need to know who to contact – they can just get their questions answered. The corporate ticketing system, built on ManageEngine, gives them the ability to do that.

We wanted to build a single ticketing system for all business departments, not just IT.

You’ve been CIO for just over a year. So things have happened pretty quickly. How long did it take to implement?

We invested in some training to implement ManageEngine. We used the training time to configure the system to our requirements. Within two to four weeks of the training, we had implemented ManageEngine for the IT department. Within another two months, HR and facilities came on board. Then our Business Desk team joined two weeks later.

Why ManageEngine? Could you not have done all of that with your previous technology platform?

We were previously using Zendesk. We also looked at Salesforce.com and JIRA. Ultimately, we felt that we’d be able to implement the quickest with ManageEngine.

We also like the categorization of data with ManageEngine. We can define tickets in terms of categories and sub-categories, which we couldn’t do easily in Zendesk.

Also, staff that have been with us for quite a while, or certain suppliers, are used to routing queries to dedicated email aliases such as facilities@imprivata.com. With ManageEngine we are able to route all tickets through the same system.

We’re pleased with the tool and how configurable it is.

 What impact has your corporate ticketing system had on business departments outside IT?

Teams have stated they have much better visibility into tickets. The old model was primarily email-driven, so a manager would be dependent on the team to gauge how things were going. Now, managers can see exactly what issues are arising and what issues remain outstanding to allow them to prepare for the next day. Having that visibility has been very helpful.

Visibility of issues has also been very useful for the responsiveness of departments. For example if an employee raises an issue with the heating in the UK and the office manager is out, a team in another country can address the issue and provide coverage. Previously, the issue would have been stuck in someone’s email inbox.

How are issues from all these different departments routed?

Our first line of defense is usually the service desk. A single tracking mechanism for all tickets across all departments on the same platform has been very helpful. We usually receive about 40-60 tickets a day.

Imprivata employees typically log issues via three main channels:

  1. More than half of all staff work in the corporate headquarters, so a good proportion of tickets are raised via walk-ups.
  2. Tickets can be logged via email through help@imprivata.com
  3. You can go into the system, http://help.imprivata.com, directly via a browser and log a ticket

Everything goes into this platform, from “it’s too cool in here” to “my machine is broken.” From here, our first priority is to understand what’s coming in and process it. We try to resolve the issue on the first line straight away or route the ticket to a department queue or specialist.

You’ve mentioned that categorisation of tickets was important in your tool selection process – why is this so important to Imprivata?

Classification is important to us because if we see common or repeated issues, we try to 1) group them into common problem sets, 2) solve them and understand the root cause, and 3) prevent it from happening again.

For example, our new hire process includes a list of things that need to be done to support a new hire. If I see a ticket from a new hire asking for help in printing something – that means we’ve failed in the new hire process. Printer drivers were not installed properly, or we don’t have the correct FAQs for them to turn to. This information lets us know how we’re doing from a process standpoint.

That seems quite advanced problem management compared to other organizations we speak to.

We try to be very, very, analytical about how we think about our support model.

We’re quite small, and we extensively use interns. So our support model and process has to be very well-defined for us to be successful.

How do you measure success?

We provide internal support, making sure folks on the frontline selling products to customers are getting the help they need. Our measure of success is happy customers and customer satisfaction.

We measure how long it takes to get back to people, how long does it take to close a ticket and resolve an issue. How often are we reopening a ticket because we didn’t get it right first time?

We also have a process for checking aged tickets out there. Our internal customers know that they can escalate tickets if they are not getting what they need. We’ve built some automation with ManageEngine to monitor and escalate against SLAs, but we’ve also built communication channels for customers to provide feedback.

Would you recommend ManageEngine?

I would.

It’s flexible enough to manage our tickets within a best practice framework. We’re a public company, and there are certain processes we need to follow to adhere to legislation. For example, anyone that requires access to the general ledger system needs pre-approval. We’re governed by regulations such as Sarbanes Oxley that we know we’re going to be audited on, so having a system that supports us with these elements while managing our business in an efficient manner was a key requirement. So far, ManageEngine has delivered on those requirements.

Is there anything you would change if you had the choice?

Certain things could be better from a reporting point of view. It is not always intuitive, so we are reliant on the support team to help us out quite a bit. There a few nit-pick items such as the ability to

classify tickets with more refinement than today. But overall, we are very satisfied with ManageEngine.

How has the ManageEngine team responded to these or issues suggestions?

It’s been a mixed bag. Sometimes they are very responsive; sometimes it takes a couple of days. Given how important the system is to us, we’d pay for a faster response time if it were available.

We’d also like to invest in consulting services to address our reporting needs but have been pointed back to the support team. These are nit-picks, not showstoppers; but if these areas were improved, we’d be extremely happy.

What version are you running? Are you on the free version?

We started with the free version but quickly transitioned to the paid model.


Overall Review of ManageEngine by Imprivata

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“The investment in ManageEngine is very easy to justify. The cost of running ManageEngine is not very expensive. And the fact that we can automate ticketing for other business departments within the same budget as our previous IT helpdesk is a real bonus”

Strengths

  1.  General flexibility
  2. Ability to adapt to business requirements

Weaknesses

  1. More granularity in classifications
  2. Reporting requires more depth, it is not intuitive as it could be

Ratings

  • Product 8/10
  • Ease of use and intuitiveness 8/10
  • Reporting 8/10
  • Overall satisfaction with ManageEngine 9.5/10

ITSM Evolution – Practical Steps to Stay Current

Using ITSM Tools can be like rummaging through a garage full of old tools that you rarely use in order to find one or two tools that you do
Using ITSM solutions can be like rummaging through a garage full of old tools that you rarely use in order to find one or two tools that you do

ITSM Evolution – Practical Steps to Stay Current is a guest post contributed by Dirk Anderson, Head of Product at RedPixie

 

With the growth in BYOD and the consumerisation of devices, more and more enterprises are adapting the way that they use technology to service the business effectively.   However, many ITSM tools have been designed to give traditional IT teams a way to manage traditional services and processes at a component level only, whether that’s processing tickets or responding to an individual end-user request.  The challenge, however, is whether or not ITSM evolution is possible and demands of the business can be met using the current tools at our disposal.

Today, firms need to ask themselves if this type of service level approach, using legacy methods, can flourish, or even survive in the future. This article will look at the practical steps that we’d recommend IT Service Managers consider, to deliver services that address the needs of the internal ‘business customers’ in a dynamic business environment, where user expectations are more demanding than ever.

 

Step 1: Know your customers

As a matter of course, you should already be undergoing customer satisfaction surveys or have appropriate forums for regular dialogue with your internal business customers. Use these forums to gain an appreciation of how your customers do business today, what IT services they use and what may change in the future. It is likely that:

  • Your business will be using more personal devices and business customers will expect to access corporate applications and data securely from those devices
  • Your business customers will be embarrassed if their business partners and guests cannot easily use your enterprise guest wireless whilst they’re visiting
  • Your business customers will expect to work effectively from wherever they are
  • They will expect to walk to another desk or meeting room and instantly access the IT services, applications and data at those locations

Expectations are changing. It’s important to explore these areas, and never shy away from hearing frustrations. Canvas their views on new service capabilities that would improve their experience and help them be more productive.

 

Step 2: Pay attention to your IT service portfolio

Look at the IT consumer services that you provide, and break them into categories. There is high chance that you will have one category (and call it what you prefer), has a large percentage helpdesk tickets that are similar. This means that “your consumers” repeatedly need to consume these same critical services. These include: resetting passwords or removing software on end user devices. It is important that you automate these services and allow the business to self-serve. This will free your team up to focus on the emerging services that need to become part of your service portfolio. As you add those new services, some may fall into this same category. Consider how automation and self-service capability is applied to those emerging services.

 

Step 3: Evolve ITSM Toolkit to Meet IT Service Goals

As you evolve your service portfolio, how well does your current ITSM toolset fit your strategic needs? It is important to evolve your ITSM toolkit to meet your longer term IT service objectives. Can you easily add common cloud services and can you automate and allow your consumers to self-serve?

In larger enterprises, you should think like a public cloud provider. You provide the capacity and the technologies and your customers help themselves to the most common services, without the IT team’s involvement. You should focus on managing areas such as, overall service capacity, the software license position and the development of your service portfolio. Commonly used or repeatable IT services should be available to your customers to help themselves, in the way customers consume Microsoft cloud services, for example, without the need to involve Microsoft’s Cloud IT support team. If your ITSM toolkit does not support that strategy, then you need to consider replacing or adding to those tools, to support a more strategic focus. That may mean looking at new ITSM capabilities that augment existing processes and tools to deliver “new world” capability within your service portfolio.

 

Step 4: Review and measure

As your service evolves, make sure that you have a continuous review cycle in place with an internal business customer group.  It’s important to measure not only how the service portfolio fits the changing needs of the business but also whether your ITSM “toolkit” allows you to shape your service around your changing business. The following are critical:

  • Know your service portfolio – To measure the services that you provide as an enterprise IT team, be clear on the portfolio of services provided. It starts with a list of those services, typically on a web portal explaining clearly what the services are (and are not). The portfolio needs an overall owner, typically a senior IT head, and the individual services require service owners, such as IT line managers. This list of the services requires ongoing maintenance.
  • Manage the service portfolio – Work with business representatives and senior IT stakeholder to ensure that the portfolio remains manageable. As new services are used, you need to be able to remove other services, unless the business is willing to fund you to support an ever-growing and unsustainable portfolio.
  • Measure the service portfolio – Develop a way to measure your portfolio. This needs to include which services are used by whom, and the level of consumption. Undertake a Service Review, and work with the business to get feedback on the quality of those services. Understand the cost of providing those services, relative to their business value.
  • Build a Governance Function – Be open and discuss the importance of not creating a technical debt because of a “bloated” portfolio. You only have so much capacity as an IT function. Consider building a senior governance function to support the integration of new technology capabilities whilst removing non-strategic services and technologies.

In summary do everything you can to know your customers, understand your changing service portfolio, be aware of current limitations in your ITSM toolkit and evolve it for emerging demands, and lastly, proactively review and measure.

 

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Get involved with ITIL Manifesto Google Hangouts!

Just hanging about
Just hanging about

ITIL Manifesto Update

We’ve come quite a long way in a fairly short space of time. And there’s a lot more to do.

We’re running two public Google Hangouts On Air in January.

These hangouts will have up to ten active participants (and you can be one of the ten – see below). They’re also broadcast live via YouTube. Viewers on YouTube can ask questions via a comments feature which we’ll collect and answer (if we can!) towards the end of the session. You’re also invited to submit questions ahead of the hangouts and we’ll try to answer as many of these as possible too.

(For a recap on where we are and the data we’ve gathered – see: http://itil-manifesto.wikia.com/wiki/Phase_2_Output )

Planned Hangout On Air Schedule

1. What is the ITIL Manifesto? Tuesday 13th Jan 2014 starting 8pm (20:00) GMT

  • A session to agree the intent, purpose and definition of the ITIL Manifesto.
  • We gathered many great ideas earlier in the year, and we still want to do something with them. The ITSM14 session asked us questions we didn’t necessarily have answers for, so this is a session to answer one of them – and arguably the most important – what the purpose, intent and definition of the ITIL Manifesto is.
  • We’ll also talk about the ITIL Manifesto in relation to similar initiatives, who our customers are and how we test the manifesto with them.

2. Structure & Deliverables for the ITIL Manifesto Tuesday 20th Jan 2014 starting 8pm (20:00) GMT

  • How are we going to present the manifesto? What format will it take?
  • A number of themes were identified during the early idea gathering phases. This session will review those, agree the themes the manifesto will address and talk about how the themes and grouped ideas will be turned into the finished product.
  • How do we release the finished product(s)? What mechanisms (such as Creative Commons) can we consider to let it be freely available whilst recognising the people who have input their time and effort to the initiative?
  • We’ll discuss attribution, commercialisation, derivative works.
  • After this session, we’ll ask for individuals and community groups to start working on part or all of the end products – the manifesto statements and principles.

Getting Involved as an active participant

If you’d like to be one of the ten in either (or both*) sessions, please email rob@changeandrelease.com and let me know which session you’d like to be in, a short bio, and why you’d like to be involved. You’ll need to have fairly decent internet access, a webcam and a google account to sign in to the hangout. Full requirements here.

You’ll also need to prepare a short introduction (max 45s) covering who you are, your areas of expertise in the IT or business world and can include who you work for and your current role if you’re comfortable sharing that. It should also cover what interest you have in the ITIL Manifesto – what it means to you personally.

(*if demand is high we may have to restrict people to just one hangout)

Getting Involved as a viewer

If you don’t want to be part of the active discussion but would like to observe and ask questions, either during the session or beforehand, then that’s equally as valuable. Don’t be afraid to ask hard questions – we want the final product to stand up to scrutiny and provide real value.

  • Asking questions before the hangout: Please post them in the comment thread below this article.
  • Asking questions during the hangout: Stay tuned for instructions on how to view and comment on the public hangout nearer the time.

Subscribe to the ITSM Review Newsletter, keep an eye on theitsmreview.com, the twitter tag #itilmanifesto and the Facebook group Back2ITSM for more information.
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12th December is Christmas jumper day!

Friday 12th December is Save the Children’s Christmas Jumper Day. Now in it’s third year, the children’s charity has raised over £1.6M to date.

It’s quite simple. Wear your christmas jumper on 12th December and donate. UK readers can TEXT WOOLLY to 70050 to donate £2 see http://jumpers.savethechildren.org.uk/ for further details.

Merry Christmas from all the Enterprise Opinions team:

We hope you enjoyed us spreading the jumper joy!

Thanks for your support throughout 2014, Merry Christmas, and all the very best for 2015.

~ Martin

#XMASJUMPERDAY

Review: Samanage for Outside IT 2014

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Samanage

This independent review is part of our Outside IT Review.

To download the full report as a PDF please visit : http://download.itassetmanagement.net/outside-it/

 

Executive Summary

Elevator Pitch Vendor pitch is around speed of implementation and lack of need for technical input and ease of use.
Strengths
  • Native Cloud application and all clients on current version – simple for non-IT people to implement without IT infrastructure requirements
  • Implementation is focussed on lack of need for training and consultancy – based around ‘intuitive’ product, using videos and other media
  • Vendor (relatively new to market) reports selling and winning against traditional IT service management (ITSM) products on capability, ease of use and ease of implementation – with experience of non-IT implementation
Weaknesses
  • Workflow tool does not have graphic presentation which may be an issue for non-IT users in particular
  • SMB focus – limited implementation experiences in larger enterprises
Primary Market Focus According to the information provided, Samanage primarily targets the midmarket

Commercial Summary

Vendor Samanage
Product Samanage
Version reviewed n/a – continuous deployment
Date of version Release n/a
Year Founded 2007
Customers 500+
Pricing Structure For service desk, prices start at $1,000 per service desk technician for service desk and $12 for each computer asset for Asset Management
Competitive Differentiators
  • Agile and continuous deployment model – customer always on latest version and updates protected
  • Code free deployment using user-friendly interfaces means fast time to value
  • Integrated and simple to use Service Desk and asset management modules aims to save time for agents

Independent Review

Product

In The ITSM Review’s opinion, the solution has a clean interface, which appears to be straightforward and easy to use. Workflows can be built simply using drag and drop.

The solution offers a useful feature to ask for help across IT on tickets without requiring escalation. Good practical usability for scanning tickets – ‘Eye’ function allows scan of details without need to open ticket.

Marketing

Samanage states that the product can be easily developed to provide work management and admin functions beyond IT – e.g. HR, Finance, Purchasing etc. However, no current off the shelf Outside IT applications are marketed/offered.

Current focus is on existing IT customers with a view to up-selling to internal departments at a later date. This means that there is no focus on Outside IT in external marketing activities, however this may change in the future as the company evolves.

Sales Strategy

Growing business replacing legacy on-premise solutions as well as low-end SaaS competitors. Focus on demo or trial early in new engagements with prospective customers as to allow user experience and ease of use to do the selling.

Current Use

Limited implementation experience in large and enterprise markets, with a limited global reach at present compared to established competitors. Some existing bespoke applications built for HR, payroll, purchasing.

In Summary

Samanage offer a SMB focussed ITSM solution that looks to be easy to implement and develop and, according to the vendor, has been used by several organisations for functionality beyond IT. We believe that Samanage is a good competitively priced option for small-to-medium sized looking for general ITSM capabilities.

In The ITSM Review’s opinion, Samanage needs to focus on developing its presence in the ITSM market and find a suitable niche either directly in IT or as a bridge to other Service Management areas. Samanage is currently competing against whole market and this may not be sustainable. The brand could be developed to be more service-specific.

In their own words

“Samanage provides the only true multitenant, unified service desk and asset management cloud solution on the market today. For our customers, that translates into the fastest time to value, higher ROI, outstanding service, and most importantly happy end users. Samanage customers enjoy an “always new” application without ever having to perform any maintenance functions.

Our revolutionary user interface delivers an unmatched user experience, allowing customers to fully deploy a robust IT Service Management (ITSM) solution in less than 2 weeks, easily expand beyond IT, and maximize adoption. End users are empowered through an easy to use self-service portal, and technicians have a full-featured platform available at their fingertips on any device.

Customers achieve instant value with Samanage because they are operational immediately and able to go live in days…in less time than it takes to evaluate other solutions. They have instant, accurate visibility into all hardware and software assets, no matter where assets are located. And because our service desk and asset management is on a unified platform, customers are able to easily connect their people, services, and assets all through the same UI. Visually stunning in-app analytics also enable rapid trend detection and easy access to actionable information.

Samanage’s goal is to help customers deliver a superior service experience to their end users, and real value throughout their organization by improving asset control, empowering end users, and maximizing resources.“

To download the full report as a PDF please visit : http://download.itassetmanagement.net/outside-it/

Review: Cherwell for Outside IT 2014

logo_cherwell-softwareCherwell Service Management

This independent review is part of our Outside IT Review.

To download the full report as a PDF please visit : http://download.itassetmanagement.net/outside-it/

 

Executive Summary

Elevator Pitch Cherwell is an established vendor within the ITSM market, with a particular focus on Customer Experience. It has a growing emphasis on use of its product and service management beyond the IT/ITSM area, and is seen to market and promote the concepts of IT enablement positively and consistently.Cherwell boasts a number of customer success stories and positive case studies of the use of the product beyond IT. There is a clear connection between their marketing messages and implementation stories in this area.Cherwell provides fully inclusive concurrent user usage for both perpetual and SaaS licensing models. Product is sold as one complete application, i.e. not modular
Strengths
  • Intuitive interface for building and maintaining workflow and extended functionality – attractive object based forms, workflow and reports
  • Product provides secure framework for user-developed configuration that is protected for upgrades
  • Vendor promotes positive and experienced approach to customer experience and tools as enabler for service management and business functions
Weaknesses
  • Vendor will need to maintain focus on where to sell and implement – IT and beyond – as organisation is still growing
  • Product can look extensive and perhaps complicated – turnkey non-IT applications/canned versions would be helpful
  • No turnkey Outside IT applications currently available
Primary Market Focus Based on the information provided, Cherwell Service Management is primarily a mid-market solution with the ability to be scaled-up to enterprise class organisations.

Commercial Summary

Vendor Cherwell Software
Product Cherwell Service Management
Version reviewed 4.6
Date of version Release March 2014
Year Founded 2004
Customers 600+ ITSM customers worldwide.
Pricing Structure Fully inclusive concurrent user usage for both perpetual and SaaS licensing models.
Competitive Differentiators
  • Codeless, flexible and fully configurable
  • Ability to design and build to specific business requirements – or use ‘out-of-the-box’
  • Cherwell Service Management is a useful enabling toolset to support IT and business transformation due to the ease of use and flexible nature of the product

Independent Review

Cherwell is emerging as a leader in the service management and extended shared services markets due to the scope and quality of its product, its focus on business value and its quality approach to implementation.

In The ITSM Review’s opinion, Cherwell is particularly appropriate for medium-to-large sized organisations. Whilst it does have very large (enterprise) clients, its own focus and organisation better fits the medium-large sized demographic. The product has extensive flexibility and capability, and can be developed for large or very large organisations use as required.

Marketing and messaging is focussed on speaking directly to IT and ITSM organisations, providing them with the opportunity to improve their service and provide value to their own customers. We view this as a positive, although we do believe that there is a need to develop more specific and targeted non-IT turnkey solutions in conjunction with associated marketing approaches that may be sold beyond IT.

Cherwell is set on selling to IT people and letting them sell-on the product to other areas of the business, which seems to work well, however we do feel that this may need to become a more proactive channel in order to compete with other Enterprise Service Management (ESM) solutions in the market.

Product

In The ITSM Review’s opinion Cherwell offers a strong mix of product capability, and its ease of use and non-technical capability of the product should be well supported by (IT) customers – thus easy to sell-on within organisations.

The simple and inclusive upgrade path also works well as a positive alternative to legacy and large enterprise solutions where bespoke product development can add risk, cost and delay to upgrading. Cherwell have a model which provides a secure technical framework that clients can work within to build their own solutions and which is then protected as part of the upgrade path.

Marketing

The vendors’ organisation and approach is focussed on promoting and supporting IT as an enabler and driver for business success. Cherwell take a pragmatic approach to this, depending on the maturity and needs of the client as identified during the sales process.

In terms of industry and media messaging, we feel that Cherwell has adopted a positive and engaging set of value propositions around traditional values, people and customer experience. The focus on traditional values is centred around the need for back to basics implementations, focussed on customer needs, simple ITSM concepts and the need to engage with people – i.e. Cherwell push out the message that the product is not the answer to everything.

Sales Strategy

Cherwell has had to work to improve its brand visibility over the last few years and is now well placed and recognised in the ITSM market place. Approach to sales is seen to be positive, professional and consultative, developing dialogue where possible to engage and provide prospects with confidence in the product and company.

In our view, Cherwell will need to maintain focus on where to sell and implement IT, and beyond, as the organisation is still growing.

Current Use

Examples of current customers using Cherwell Service Management outside of IT include implementations in HR, Finance, Legal, and Sales and Marketing.

In Summary

We feel that Cherwell Service Manager is a good option to consider for those medium-to-large organisations looking to develop their service management practices starting from their existing ITSM implementation. The product is simple to develop and configure as a business application so should have a fast time-to-value. Our only reservation would be around the need for turnkey non-IT applications to be provided in order to further provide timesaving solutions for IT and non-IT clients.

In The ITSM Review’s opinion, in the future Cherwell needs to consider where to focus its sales and messaging for implementation – i.e. marketing/selling solely to IT organisations or engaging with other business areas. As the organisation is still growing it needs to ensure that it does not spread its resources too thinly, as otherwise it risks losing focus on key markets. The approach to let IT customers ‘sell-on’ is laudable, although this may need to be strengthened with more turnkey offerings in order to compete and provide clear differentiators.

In Their Own Words

“Cherwell Software is one of the fastest growing IT service management software providers. It began with simple goals: to make service desk software it would want to use and to do business honestly, putting customers first. Cherwell Software is passionate about customer care and is dedicated to creating “innovative technology built upon yesterday values.”

Cherwell Software is one of the fastest growing IT service management software providers with corporate headquarters in Colorado Springs, CO, U.S.A. and EMEA headquarters in Swindon, U.K. A global team of dedicated employees and expert partners who appreciate the technology – but love customers – serve in North America, South America, Asia and Australia. Cherwell Software recently received the SDI Best Vendor of the Year award.

Cherwell’s flagship product, Cherwell Service ManagementTM, delivers an innovative, award-winning and holistic approach to service management, allowing IT and support departments to align with organisation strategy and to deliver maximum IT business value. Cherwell Service Management is the affordable, easy-to-use, ITSM suite with maximum portability. With Cherwell ChoiceTM concurrent licensing and flexible hosting model, you can choose what works best for your business — SaaS or purchase, and hosted on-premises, hosted by Cherwell or hosted by a third party.”

To download the full report as a PDF please visit : http://download.itassetmanagement.net/outside-it/

Review: TOPdesk for Outside IT 2014

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TOPdesk

This independent review is part of our Outside IT Review.

To download the full report as a PDF please visit : http://download.itassetmanagement.net/outside-it/

 

Executive Summary

Elevator Pitch TOPdesk offers ‘out-of-the-box’ service management solutions, with standard configurations and integrations for ease of use
Strengths
  • Product is already been used by existing customer base for shared services
  • Product appears to be very user-friendly and simple to build upon and develop for varied use
  • Contains many out-of-the-box templates for internal/organisational functions, e.g. ordering company car, request cleaning etc.
Weaknesses
  • Sales approach based around assumption of shared services rather than supporting IT to grow collaborative approach
  • Limited marketing and sales focus on ‘enabling IT’ – demo based on standard IT service management (ITSM) application which can then be modified
  • Tailoring/configuration looks relatively complicated and limited for end users
Primary Market Focus Based on the information provided, TOPdesk markets to organisations ranging from small (-100 users) to very large, multi-national customers (10,000+ users)

Commercial Summary

Vendor TOPdesk
Product TOPdesk
Version reviewed 5
Date of version Release 2012
Year Founded 1993
Customers 4000+
Pricing Structure The licensing structure is based on the number of end users that the customer wishes to support with the software. This structure allows customers to have an unlimited number of agents, operators and technicians working on the tickets themselves. Both on-premise and SaaS options, hosted by TOPdesk, are available.
Competitive Differentiators
  • Native web-based tool and vendor with broad experience of service implementation across different business areas
  • Licensing structure based on the number of end users rather than system users
  • Product has an excellent ‘multi-tenancy’ approach – a multiple process view to manage shared services across departments and processes – good for field service management and Managed Services Providers

Independent Review

TOPdesk is an established vendor with good global coverage. The solution is primarily used for standard ITSM, but many customers also use the tool for Field Service and Shared Service management.

In The ITSM Review’s opinion, the product looks user-friendly and straightforward to build and develop for varied use. Furthermore, the ‘Forms Design Module’ looks easy to use to build applications with intuitive non-technical skills, which can then be taken forward by people outside traditional IT operational areas.

Marketing

Marketing is primarily focused on ‘Shared Services’, as well as ITSM/service desk, with limited marketing focus around enabling IT, although strong positioning on ease of use and bespoke Outside IT experience.

Sales Strategy

In our view, TOPdesk could do more to promote the success and evolution of its IT/ITSM customers via collaboration – this would be especially useful as more market players focus on enabling IT. From what we experienced, its sales and demo approach seems to take shared services for granted, rather than exploring current and future needs.

Current Use

According to TOPdesk, 63% of customers are currently using the solution for shared services or Outside IT functionality, with good experience and examples provided of product being used for HR, Finance, Sales and Marketing. Customers currently using the solution outside of IT include KLM, University of Edinburgh, and Calor Gas.

In Summary

We feel that TOPdesk is a good offering for mid-sized organisations for both Service Desk and ITSM requirements. Furthermore, we believe that those organisations who already know what they want to achieve with their Outside IT plans would benefit from this solution. The solution is also an excellent offering for Field Service Management, Manager Services and shared services providers.

A key opportunity for TOPdesk, in our opinion, is to develop and promote more standard non-IT functionality and experience around their offerings, in order to compete with the expanding Service Management market.

In their own words

“TOPdesk develops ITIL-aligned Service Management Software for IT, Facilities Management, and eHRM helpdesks and is among the top five service management tools offered worldwide. Our award-winning solution, along with our ITIL verified consultants and outstanding customer support has helped over 4,000 unique customers to process questions, complaints and malfunctions. With over 20 years of service management experience, we have assisted businesses, to optimize their services with our 100% web-based and user-friendly application. TOPdesk’s modular structure accommodates a wide range of requirements from different sized organisations. TOPdesk can be hosted as a Service or can be installed on-site. All products include: extensive reporting options, clear overviews and a handy Plan Board for planning your resources. Every day, millions of users across 47 countries trust in TOPdesk as their service management solution. Raising your service levels and reducing your workload and costs have never been easier.

TOPdesk offers out-of-the-box service management solutions, therefore standard integrations, configuration and other imports are all covered by the implementation process. Our customers are able to customise their TOPdesk system, by choosing the modules, processes and functionalities they actually require. We aim to reduce service desk agents’ stress and reduce their workload by applying a well-defined, standardised, yet configurable and flexible service management tool. This is why TOPdesk is modular in structure, allowing customers to add new processes as they grow.

TOPdesk offers Enterprise and Professional products meeting requirements of every type of organisation from small businesses to large, multinational companies. The framework for both products includes our revolutionary resource management planner, the Plan Board and the Task Board that displays daily workflow and the intuitive Dash Board for reports and KPIs.”

To download the full report as a PDF please visit :http://download.itassetmanagement.net/outside-it/

Review: ServiceNow for Outside IT 2014 (Best in Class)

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ServiceNow (Best in Class)

This independent review is part of our Outside IT Review.

To download the full report as a PDF please visit : http://download.itassetmanagement.net/outside-it/

 

Executive Summary

Elevator Pitch A leader in Enterprise Service Management (ESM) – ServiceNow is positively and proactively leading and driving the industry forward in using ITSM technology and practices beyond IT.ServiceNow has numerous impressive implementations of non-IT bespoke applications, and promotes this as the way forward for IT, also offering several non-IT packages to the market.
Strengths
  • Strong strategic focus and messaging/positioning to help support and drive the Outside IT/collaboration/ESM agenda
  • Toolset provides extensive and mature capability and flexibility for development, plus out-of-the-box ITSM and business process functionality
  • A large number of established turnkey business (non-IT) applications provided e.g. for HR, finance, facilities and asset management
  • Impressive number of customers already using bespoke applications Outside IT in areas such as: HR, Finance, Sales and Marketing, Facilities, Legal, Procurement, etc.
Weaknesses
  • Vendor and product positioned for large-to-very-large size organisations – culture, approach and budget may not fit small-to-medium and mid-market organisations
  • Message and culture may not fit with more traditional organisations/departments not currently looking to integrate or collaborate across internal functions
Primary Market Focus Based on the information provided, ServiceNow is primarily a large-to-very large market solution.

Commercial Summary

Vendor ServiceNow
Product ServiceNow IT Service Automation SuiteServiceNow Service Automation Platform
Version reviewed Eureka
Date of version Release June 2014
Year Founded 2004
Customers 2000+ customers world-wide, of which over 400 are Global 2000 organisations
Pricing Structure “ServiceNow products are sold in suites or individually and are prices monthly on a user basis. Orchestration and Discovery are options that are priced monthly on a node or device basis, respectively.”
Competitive Differentiators
  • Strong presence as enterprise-wide solution provider, following initial emergence as market-disruptive SAAS option
  • Leader in the market in terms of promoting and delivering enterprise-wide solutions that extend beyond IT

Independent Review

ServiceNow is an established leading player in the enterprise ITSM market. The product is multi-functional and appears to be highly configurable to customer requirements. Furthermore, it offers extensive options and capabilities in and beyond ITSM for all internal service functions – e.g. HR, Finance, Customer Service, etc.

In the review ServiceNow provided the most extensive and comprehensive list of examples of customer implementations Outside IT, a good example of which is REI, which uses the toolset for HR and Finance as well as for IT requests and functionality.

This, in tandem with an impressive list of existing bespoke and turnkey business applications in the product, in our opinion makes ServiceNow a proactive leader in the Outside IT space.

Marketing

In The ITSM Review’s opinion, ServiceNow has taken the lead in the ITSM market by promoting the opportunity for IT departments to re-invent themselves and become the facilitators of change and automation across all areas of organisations, using the basic concepts of ITSM and the toolset capabilities.

This service automation capability is branded as an opportunity for ESM and is promoted as an enabler and differentiator for IT organisations to recover credibility and relevance with their customer base.

Sales Strategy

In our view, ServiceNow’s approach to sales strategy is game-changing, given that it can help to re-define value and purpose for IT organisations, by helping them to succeed in ways that traditional IT (and other internal service) departments have struggled for years. It is also clear that the market needs this sort of focus and organisations that are adopting “collaboration” principles are thriving and are focussed on key business needs rather than being weighed down by internal process and functional divisions.

ServiceNow is currently leveraging sales based on this wider business or ESM focus, beyond IT and ITSM, which should continue to support sales growth, as more organisations require internal functions to be integrated and collaborative with the rest of the business.

Current Use

ServiceNow also offers a number of turnkey products, i.e. ServiceNow built non-IT applications, available for areas such as HR, facilities etc. together with customer built custom apps available via ServiceNow Share.

The ServiceNow sales and marketing message and positioning is co-ordinated to drive the message of collaboration across organisations, a refreshed focus on ESM, which is supported by sales and operations teams who are targeting this type of sale.

ServiceNow is established as a global vendor selling to large and enterprise organisations. ServiceNow uses positive IT/ITSM industry and media messaging, high profile events and media to promote their offerings and the ESM approach.

ServiceNow also uses an extensive global network of service providers and partners for building, delivering and implementing its products and business applications.

ServiceNow also integrate with, or are building integrations with, over 85 companies/technologies, thus showing proven experience and accessibility in linking with other technologies.

In Summary

In The ITSM Review’s opinion, ServiceNow is an excellent option for large-and-very large sized businesses looking to achieve synergy and efficiency of cross-departmental operations, as well as flexibility in their IT and wider non-IT shared service operations. Furthermore, we believe it is an excellent option for large and very large organisations implementing service management and work automation across and beyond IT.

We feel that ESM is a strong and forward-thinking message and an excellent opportunity for real success through ITSM and wider service management and automation. In our opinion, this is a stronger and more sustainable message than ServiceNow’s earlier focus on Cloud/commercial models, community and flexibility (although useful and helpful) as the ESM message transcends IT and straddles business areas and can finally take ITSM to a C-Level audience for sales and delivered value.

In our view, continued expansion via the ESM message and product capability for Global Enterprises should be the ServiceNow goal, possibly with some options on how to take this message to the mid-market market in future.

In their own words

“ServiceNow is the enterprise IT cloud company. We transform IT by automating and managing IT service relationships across the global enterprise. Organizations deploy our service to create a single system of record for IT and automate manual tasks, standardize processes, and consolidate legacy systems. Using our extensible platform, our customers create custom applications and evolve the IT service model to service domains inside and outside the enterprise.

ServiceNow offers a portfolio of robust cloud-based products that automate and manage IT service relationships across the enterprise. Our products have the advantage of being built on a single cloud platform that consists of one user interface, one code base and one data model, delivering easy, automated upgrades. ServiceNow provides an intuitive and approachable user experience complete with expert services to accelerate time-to-value.
The ServiceNow Service Automation Platform is a highly configurable, approachable and extensible cloud platform built on an enterprise-grade infrastructure. All ServiceNow applications, as well as custom applications created by ServiceNow customers and partners, are built on this common, underlying platform.

ServiceNow IT Service Automation applications evolve the service model so that IT can spend more time delivering innovative business solutions and less time managing infrastructure overhead. ServiceNow enterprise IT users can replace redundant processes and fragmented service systems with an application suite that utilizes a single data model. This provides a single system of record for IT. With ServiceNow, IT can consolidate legacy systems, automate manual tasks, and consumerize the user experience.”

To download the full report as a PDF please visit :http://download.itassetmanagement.net/outside-it/

Review: Outside IT 2014

OutsideITTo download the full report as a PDF please visit : Outside IT 5th August 2014

This is a competitive review of software vendors who offer Outside IT capabilities as part of their IT service management (ITSM) solution.
Products reviewed:

 

Outside IT 2014 – Best in Class

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In The ITSM Review’s opinion, ServiceNow is an excellent option for large-and-very large sized businesses looking to achieve synergy and efficiency of cross-departmental operations, as well as flexibility in their IT and wider non-IT shared service operations. Furthermore, we believe it is an excellent option for large and very large organisations implementing service management and work automation across and beyond IT.

We feel that ESM is a strong and forward-thinking message and an excellent opportunity for real success through ITSM and wider service management and automation. In our opinion, this is a stronger and more sustainable message than ServiceNow’s earlier focus on Cloud/commercial models, community and flexibility (although useful and helpful) as the ESM message transcends IT and straddles business areas and can finally take ITSM to a C-Level audience for sales and delivered value.

In our view, continued expansion via the ESM message and product capability for Global Enterprises should be the ServiceNow goal, possibly with some options on how to take this message to the mid-market market in future.

Overview

This report has been unusual in terms of a normal industry product/vendor review – for two reasons:

  1. The initial review criteria were quite generic (by necessity) and to some extent vague (i.e. “what have you done with your product outside of IT?”) and
  2. The results and outcomes are not particularly (or only) related to functionality or product capability – and this relates strongly to marketing, positioning and implementation approach.

As a review of what vendors can or are doing with their (ITSM) products outside of the IT and ITSM operational area, this review had to be somewhat open-ended, giving the participating vendors specific requirements to follow, but also opening up the options for them to show us what else they can do and are doing outside of IT. This includes not just options on software functionality but also how the vendors are positioning themselves in the market.

Each vendor in this report provides ITSM tools that can be used to build forms and workflow based automation for administration of ‘back-office’ work, this includes: managing workloads; requests; automating approvals and escalations; automating spreadsheets and other databases centrally to remove risk; provide customer service and call centre tools; manage work schedules; provide knowledge repositories, calendars, reports dashboards and customer portals etc. In addition, they each provide this functionality in a modern, social, mobile and intuitive ‘connected’ environment that can be quickly implemented and maintained with minimum technical resources.

So what are the differences between the vendors in this report? How can we distinguish and identify differentiators, pros and cons between them? If all products can be used to develop work automation, logging and escalation/ownership and tracking of tasks etc., does this mean that the differences between vendors go beyond simple software functionality? This review looks at how to differentiate the vendors’ approach for beyond IT across the ITSM market.

Industry Context

There has been a move in recent times to develop more applications and tools that can cross the boundaries of internal service departments. The ITSM toolsets available have helped to drive practice in this area, in particular service catalogues, service portals, automated fulfilment processing, approvals etc. and for many organisations this is a huge opportunity for IT to be the department of solutions and success rather than simply the folks who say ‘no’ all the time.

Most manufacturers of ITSM tools report that their sales engagement process usually now involve the inclusion of non-IT people as the norm which has happened historically although not consistently with many vendors also reporting the fact that, once their ITSM tool has been successfully implemented, their clients in IT then help to ‘sell on’ the wider use of the toolsets within and across their own organisations.

Much of this has been driven by the opportunities offered via Cloud solutions and also via assorted sourcing options. However, the barriers between IT and its internal customers/departments are now also breaking down such that, finally, there is the appreciation that the overall needs of the organisation they support can be met via a ‘supply chain’ approach rather than a siloed one. Commoditisation of IT has led to greater awareness of, and demand for, proper end-to-end solutions and collaborative working. Toolsets are the final piece in this jigsaw, as they offer simple and effective solutions for this.

Opportunities for IT organisations

This is therefore a time of huge opportunity for IT organisations to re-invent themselves and to show their true value to the organisations that they serve. This moves away from just being inward-looking and self preserving around their own (IT) processes but to also being the facilitator, catalyst and ‘solution superheroes’ for the whole organisation. This can help to develop efficiency and remove risk by automating manual and single point of failure processes and systems, e.g. spreadsheets that still provide key business functions.

IT can show leadership in their own businesses if they grasp the nettle and use the skills they have developed via ITSM and the associated toolsets, relationship management, value-demonstration, service monitoring, and cost management. It’s the time and opportunity to take ITSM to the next level and IT organisations and their people are best placed to deliver this.

Client maturity

Whilst this sounds exciting, there is also the question of maturity and awareness, and this brave new world cannot apply across all organisations evenly. There are those IT organisations that have the maturity and drive to take their knowledge and skills forward to capitalise on these opportunities. These organisations will respond well to vendor positioning and messaging around business-led IT and the value of service management beyond IT.

However, there are also many (probably most) IT organisations that don’t yet have the vision, awareness, bandwidth and ITSM maturity to do this.

This is where intelligent use of new sourcing models can help to ensure that IT is moving with the times and delivering in response to needs and not just “treading water” and “sweating assets”.

These organisations will also be at risk of being by-passed in the sales process of forward thinking vendors who can then sell direct to other service areas (not IT) with their products and solutions. Vendors with mature implementations and good client relationships can also develop these accounts to “sell inwardly” as mentioned, and get the message across about collaborative working – with variable success depending on their ability to reach and get the right messages to the C-Levels working in their clients.

The new world of corporate collaboration

The message here for the vendor market – and in the context of this review – is therefore that ITSM vendors wishing to retain and increase their market share into new areas need to consider the positioning of their products in a wider context than just IT.

Products and vendors that only focus on internal IT – sold to internally focussed IT departments who don’t see the opportunities for collaboration – will be at risk, or at least will risk falling behind in the long run. There may be continuing opportunities for relatively straightforward ITSM-only sales in the short-term, but ultimately this will not be a sustainable strategy.

Vendors also need to be clear on how to reach non-IT people where necessary, as well as having clear strategies for up-selling their products beyond IT in existing and new accounts. Overall they will need to be clear as to the extent to which they take and promote these messages – from presenting either a business-focussed/business-enabled solution, to an IT-internally-focused only approach.

So whilst there is still a lively traditional ITSM ‘core market’ that vendors can focus on – where the prospects may not be interested in Outside IT (i.e. applications and their focus is solely on ITSM) – there is also a longer-term and potentially larger opportunity around selling to the wider organisation.

Clearly for vendors this requires some strategic decision making around positioning and marketing, with some implications around sales approach and targeting. This in turn may have significant cost and structural implications for vendors, and some may not have the resources to meet these requirements.

So the traditional sale to mid-management IT Operations may be simpler and easier in the short-term, but longer-term vendors may need to rethink their sales and marketing approach, collateral, and even the language used in the sales process.

So how do we evaluate the current Market?

The four vendors who participated in this review all have the capabilities to provide additional functionality outside of the ITSM/IT area and they also all have varying levels of customer adoption of this. These vendors cover a broad spectrum in terms of size, capability, and corporate coverage and their focus reflects this. All vendors also have different sales and marketing approaches to the concept of Outside IT. Details and examples of their individual offerings are shown below.

All four vendors can deliver non-IT applications with varying levels of toolkits, engagement approaches, and turnkey offerings.

 

To download the full report as a PDF please visit : http://download.itassetmanagement.net/outside-it/

Disclaimer, Scope and Limitations

The information contained in this review is based on sources and information believed to be accurate as of the time it was created.  Therefore, the completeness and current accuracy of the information provided cannot be guaranteed.  Readers should therefore use the contents of this review as a general guideline, and not as the ultimate source of truth.

Similarly, this review is not based on rigorous and exhaustive technical study.  The ITSM Review recommends that readers complete a thorough live evaluation before investing in technology.

This is a paid review, that is, the vendors included in this review paid to participate in exchange for all results and analysis being published free of charge, without registration.

For further information, please read the ‘Group Tests’ section, on our Disclosure page.


The ITSM Review are holding a series of seminars this year headed by ITSM superstar Barclay Rae. We will be starting in March with Transforming User Experience – Enterprise Service Management & Self Service. For more information click here