Podcast Episode 5: SDI Winners "Less about IT and more about Service"

Thanks to our friends at SysAid for sponsoring this podcast.
Thanks to our friends at SysAid for sponsoring this podcast.

Episode 5 of the ITSM Review podcast hosted by Barclay Rae and Rebecca Beach.

Guests:

Agenda

This podcast was recorded live at the SDI Annual Conference. See more details and all the winners here

The three winners discuss the SDI awards and SDI certification process, the business benefits of exceptional service, Forrest Gump (see video below) and the evolution of Service Management careers.

“It is less about IT and more about the service” Kirsty Watson, O2

“There is no operations and the business – you ARE the business” Sarah Lahav, SysAid

“High Five! You Rock!” Rebecca Beach

Thanks to our friends at SysAid for sponsoring this podcast.

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Podcast Episode 5

CoSocius Winning Video

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Teleopti Shines With 4 Star SDI Certification

Swedish WorkForce Management (WFM) and Telecom Expense Management (TEM) company Teleopti has been awarded a “coveted” 4 star Service Desk Certification maturity rating from the Service Desk Institute (SDI).

The company had held a 3 star certification since 2010. Teleopti’s service desk joins a select group of worldwide teams who have achieved a 4 star certification including those from Telefónica, Sodexo, tickets.com and Vocalink.

Performance spanning all concept criteria

Providing support to customers in over 70 countries, Teleopti’s multi-lingual service desk, situated in Sweden and China, was praised by SDI for “raising its performance across all concept criteria” during a period of rapid expansion in to new global markets.

Düring: 4-star performer
Düring: 4-star performer

The most notable areas of improvement were:

  • certification concepts of processes,
  • partnerships and resources,
  • customer satisfaction and,
  • social responsibility.

NOTE: The SDI’s SDC audit evaluates service desk operations against an internationally accepted global standard for best practice, providing companies with a benchmark to form a baseline for service improvements.

Based around ITIL and ITSM frameworks, this certification evaluates companies in the following areas: incident and problem resolution; change and release management; service level management; availability and capacity management; configuration management; business continuity and financial management; knowledge management and customer relationship management.

 “We are delighted to receive this recognition from SDI for the continuous investments in providing an exceptional level of support to our customers and partners. Closeness is an important company value and Service Desk is the corner stone in fulfilling this. In the annual customer survey, year after year, more than 9 out of 10 customers state they would recommend Teleopti as a vendor to other companies” says Olle Düring, CEO of Teleopti.

Service Desk Manager at Teleopti Maureen Lundgren expands upon Düring’s comments saying that increasing the firm’s Service Desk Certification maturity rating is the result of a company culture where the customer always comes first.

It is also down to a dedication to defining, refining and documenting roles, responsibilities and processes,” she said.

Howard Kendall, Master Auditor at SDI summarised by saying: “The 4 star Service Desk Certification rating is an excellent achievement and testament to the well-structured programme of continuous improvement that Teleopti has in place. Coupled with this, we have evidenced exceptional leadership and excellent communication to staff who in turn are consistently motivated and developed.”

INFOGRAPHIC: Service Desk 2013 – A view from the frontline

Interesting infographic from Cherwell Software below.

“The SDI / Cherwell Software Service Desk 2013 survey [conducted December 2012] asked Service Desk professionals for their hopes, dreams, fears, frustrations and priorities for 2013. Here are the results…. the view from the frontline.”

‘Increasing our value to the business’ is still the number 1 priority.

(Am I alone in thinking the best way to quantify and prioritize service delivery is via ITAM?).

Positively, 39% report that life on the service desk has improved in the last year.

Click on the image to enlarge.

CGI/Logica gains 5-star Service Desk Institute accreditation

Tessa Troubridge, Managing Director, SDI
Tessa Troubridge, Managing Director, SDI

Logica is positively beaming with a friendly welcoming smile this month after receiving news that it has been awarded 5-star certification by the Service Desk Institute (SDI) for its UK service desk.

Now part of CGI Group Inc. as a trading entity, this is apparently the first time that any organisation has achieved the 5-star standard.

The CGI/LogicaUK service desk team, based in South Wales, supports more than 180 clients across the public and private sector. To award the 5-star certification SDI carried out a four day audit incorporating feedback from clients and staff, and worked alongside members to understand the how the team provide services to a broad range of organisations.

NOTE: In terms of form and function, the 5-star service desk certification (introduced by SDI in 2012) is said to be a definition of the “ultimate levels” of quality and delivery for world-class service desks.

It found true integration of the service desk with the wider service management functions demonstrated combined strength and committment to delivery excellence.

Tim Gregory, UK President, CGI, said: ”The SDI Service Desk Certification is testament to the hard work of the team and their commitment to providing outstanding levels of service. We invest a lot of time in our members with in-depth training upfront so they have the skills to best help meet client’s diverse needs. We also encourage the team to spend time with our clients to greater understand their overall objectives and how their business works. Investing this time from the outset, allows us to offer our clients an unrivalled level of service and, as is proven by our accreditation.”

Tessa Troubridge, Managing Director, SDI, said, “Achieving 4 star on two consecutive occasions for the SDI Service Desk Certification programme is a tremendous accolade in its own right and to be recognised as a 5* world class service desk is a truly outstanding achievement. I am delighted and proud that we have been able to certify CGI/Logica as the first 5* world class service desk.”

Troubridge also said that the service desk here is extremely impressive with a remarkable people culture. Every team member displays a tangible passion, enthusiasm and drive to deliver not only excellent customer service but to provide added value as part of every single customer engagement.

Talking of Logica’s WOW factor, Troubridge says that the culture here is evidenced throughout the fabric of the organisation, the processes in place and the unique approach to team work to enhance the customer experience.

“It is in the DNA of each of the team members, their team leaders and across all levels of management and is driven both top down and bottom up.  This exceptional people culture is one of the real WOW factors of the service desk of which they should be extremely proud and which all other service desks should aspire to achieve.”.

Barclay Rae: The Service Desk Inspector

Barclay Rae, The Service Desk Inspector
Barclay Rae, The Service Desk Inspector

ITSM Industry stalwart Barclay Rae has been working with SDI to produce some short, digestible video clips sharing news, rants and opinion on all things service management.

Barclay’s latest feature is the “Service Desk Inspector” whereby Barclay visits real organizations and offers his advice:

“Programmes will follow real organizations as they work with our ‘inspector’ Barclay Rae – an experienced ITSM consultant – to tackle their biggest service delivery challenges and improve overall performance.”

UK readers of a certain age might remember ‘The Troubleshooter’ or similar fly-on-the-wall documentaries digging into business issues. Barclay  follows a similar theme and does a sterling job. It is great to see some real life ITSM coverage with all of the ITIL framework and IT geekery stripped away.  Kudos to Mirus IT Solutions for being so candid and opening their business kimono for the entire world to see.

Episode 1

Episode 2

5 Steps to Building a Tool Selection Scorecard

At the SDI event I attended last week, Ken Goff gave a compelling talk on tool selection.

This is not a new concept and I’m sure many readers would have used similar methodologies, nonetheless the credit for this article goes to Ken and SDI.

In this article I aim to provide an overview of Ken’s logic. The goal is to build a decision matrix for tool selection that is closely aligned to your requirements. The focus is on making an objective decision based on facts and stripping away any emotion or subjective bias.

5 STEPS

  • Step 1: Define your criteria, wish-list and desires of a new tool (This is a whole topic by itself and won’t be covered here).
  • Step 2: From this list define which of your criteria are Must Haves or Show Stoppers, there is no point investing in a tool if these features are not included. The remainder will be ‘wants’ or ‘nice to haves’.
  • Step 3: Assign a weighting score against each criteria
  • Step 4: Score each tool according to the criteria, then multiply the score by the weighting score to generate an overall score. Eliminate any candidates that do not meet the ‘Must’ criteria.
  • Step 5: Total all scores to provide an overall objective rating.
To demonstrate this in action I’ll use this methodology to choose a new house to purchase.

EXAMPLE

  • Step 1: Criteria: I’m looking for a house to buy in Poole, UK. I would like 3 bedrooms, a Sea View and for the property to be in Poole.
  • Step 2: Must or Want: It must have a least 3 bedrooms (Must), The Sea View and Location are nice to have.
  • Step 3: Criteria Score: I will assign a score to the criteria as follows: 3 bedrooms (10), Sea View (8) and Poole location (5).
  • Step 4: Scoring: See table below. As an example Property 1 has no Sea View (Score 0), it has four bedrooms (score 9) and is within Poole (score 8). Total aggregate score of scores versus weightings equals 130.
  • Step 5: Property 3 has the highest score, Property 2 is eliminated because it only has 2 bedrooms (A must) and Property 1 is last.

This method might seem overkill for 3 criteria, but becomes very useful when dealing with 50+ requirements.

I have used Poole in Dorset, UK specifically as an example (The fourth highest land value, by area in the world) since it doesn’t matter how suitable your tool is if you can’t afford it. Indeed, the price range of the tool might be factored into the criteria.

Please let me know if you have anything to add to this process or if you have any experiences to share. 

Review: SDI Software Solutions Day

Image from @SDIrob

I attended the SDI Software Solutions Day at the British Library last week.

In a nutshell, it was vendor beauty parade for interested buyers.

Six ITSM vendors presented an overview of their company to a room full of SDI members. SDI members had the opportunity to engage with the vendors directly and network with their peers.

I think this is a great format. It was crystal clear that if you were attending the event you wanted to hear from the vendors and what they had to say. Vendors support many events but it is rare for the spotlight to be purely focussed on what they bring to the table.

The compere and guide for the day was Ken Goff, who was very keen to stress the importance of building a list of requirements before even thinking about looking for new technology and provided some brilliant insights into the vendor selection process (more to follow over the coming weeks).

“Every product is perfect at what it is designed to do, and rubbish at what is not designed to do” Ken Goff

When the audience were asked what they wanted most from vendors – two answers stood out for me;

  • Be honest about your shortcomings and scope.
  • Deliver on your promises

The first point is particularly interesting. As a former software sales rep I am all too familiar with the pressure to say ‘Yes’ to every question asked. It takes courage and wisdom for a vendor to say ‘You know what, that’s not really our area of expertise’.

Talking of sales reps… it seemed a little unfair for ICCM to send two sales reps along to network with the audience. Strictly speaking I guess anyone who is an SDI member can attend, but it seems a little unsporting when the other vendors had taken the time to build booths and prepare presentations.

My only criticism of an otherwise very useful and informative day is that it would have been nice to hear more from a customer perspective, some vendors mentioned what their customers were doing but there was scope for a lot more. i.e. “Here is someone that was in the position as you are now, this is what they did, these are the hurdles they faced and this is how we helped them”.

Vendors Participating: