Newsflash: Using the new Facebook feature – '911 bot' might just save your life

Hi, I’m Vawns Murphy and I’m addicted to social media. I’m forever checking my phone, updating both my personal and my work Twitter feed and I do the annoying mammy thing of posting endless pictures of my kids. Sometimes it’s the three of them looking angelic in their school uniforms but more often than not, it’s to apologise to everyone who lives near me and reassure them that no, the cat isn’t being murdered and no, there isn’t some sort of human sacrifice taking place -it’s just the 3 of them playing. I also spend quite a lot of my time geeking out at how apps and gamification can super charge all things ITSM so I think it’s fairly safe to say, I have a bit of a social media habit. It turns out that might not be such a bad thing from reading this article from Techcrunch.

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A new Facebook feature called the 911 bot was developed at the Disrupt Hackathon in New York. The chat bot is designed to help users in the event of an emergency situation by allowing you to quickly report an incident to the emergency services. When bad things happen, all too often we tend to panic or freeze, this app is designed to keep you calm, whilst notifying the emergency services and giving you clear, concise instructions on what to do until they arrive.

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The messenger chat bot allows you to report an emergency in a few clicks and can pull your location enabling it to automatically notify the nearest emergency services. You can also add pictures from your camera and have the app put you on the line with a 999 / 911 operator. What really impressed me about the bot was that depending on the emergency it can give you directions on what to do next for example administering CPR. We all know that everyone should know how to do CPR but let’s face it in a life or death situation, it’s all too easy for your mind to go blank wasting valuable seconds. Having Facebook to prompt you and guide you through the process stops the delay and means that the person having the heart attack gets help in the fastest time possible. According to the Irish Heart Foundation (check out their fab video on how to do CPR here), rapid initiation of CPR can double a person’s chances of survival in the event of a cardiac arrest so those few seconds or minutes saved could literally be the difference between life and death.

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So using my Facebook habit for the forces of good? Deal me in!! For more information on the 911 bot check out their website here.

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Patrick Bolger talks "why we have to do Agile NOW"

Patrick Bolger, Chief Evangelist at Hornbill Service Management, provides a summary of his presentation for the itSMF UK Conference and Exhibition entitled “The Good, the Bad, and the Agile”. Patrick discusses the need for Agile, it’s benefits, and why it’s not just for software development.

He also looks at how the IT landscape has changed in the past decade – it was once highly unlikely to see a company going from an idea to market captialization of $100bn in the space of ten years. This is now possible, we’ve seen it with the likes of Facebook, and Patrick talks about how companies need to keep up to stay in the game.

As well, Patrick discusses why Hornbill Service Management works with itSMF UK and the benefits the annual conference brings to his company.

Learn more about Agile at Patrick’s session at the itSMF conference in November:

The $6BN Gorilla

One of my personal indicators gauging the success of an enterprise software vendor in a market is the ‘grumble factor’.

This is an anecdotal measure that says – you can usually tell who is doing well in a market by the volume of other vendors grumbling about them. Successful vendors in the ascendancy are often accused of being ‘aggressive’, ‘discounting all over the place’ and ‘killing the market’ etc.

This is certainly the case for ServiceNow. One close competitor named them ‘The Gorilla in the market’.

On a recent analyst call with Frank Slootman, President and CEO of ServiceNow, we learned that the Gorilla is now weighing in at healthy $6BN market cap on the NYSE scales. Mummy Gorilla is very proud.

Summary

  • Last quarter revenue $102.2 million, 80% increase compared to the second quarter of 2012, and an increase of 19% from the first quarter of 2013.
  • Added 138 new customers in the second quarter, 1,778 total, customer renewal rate of 94.2%
  • ServiceNow were not in the black for the quarter. All resources are said to be feeding the machine.

(Source)

ServiceNow have slowly doubled their original entry price of $18 [See image below].

ServiceNow Stock price since IPO, June 29th 2012 (NYSE: NOW) Dowsing Rods say go long.
ServiceNow Stock price since IPO, June 29th 2012 (NYSE: NOW) Dowsing Rods say go long.

Realistic Cap?

$6BN? Really? The scope of the market says $6BN, but do ServiceNow have sufficient competitive differentiation to warrant $6BN? It’s not like their offering is totally unique, despite what Frank might be telling investors:

“Our customers are actually frustrated because it’s tough to negotiate with a vendor who doesn’t have much competition, you know,”

Hmm.

Slootman has been keen to dress down any ‘dotcom’ hysteria over their market capitalization in recent interviews. ServiceNow are clearly not shooting for any ‘best place to work’ gongs anytime soon:

“We don’t do all the lattes and back rubs and all that. My favorite perk is high-equity value,”

The ServiceNow public listing was said to restore credibility to the technology IPO process after Facebook’s listing [See image below]. Note the recent Facebook jolt in price when it was revealed mobile ads were working.

Facebook [NASDAQ:FB] IPO MAY '12 vs. ServiceNow [NYSE:NOW] IPO JUNE '12
Facebook [NASDAQ:FB] IPO MAY ’12 vs. ServiceNow [NYSE:NOW] IPO JUNE ’12
My final hobbyist chart tracks ServiceNow versus older enterprise software industry stalwarts. Most striking is the flat green line. Medic?

ServiceNow vs Industry Stalwarts (HP, IBM, CA, BMC)
ServiceNow vs Industry Stalwarts (HP, IBM, CA, BMC)

ONNAMA (Oh no not another marketing acronym)

Frank made it clear, via their “SRM” vision that the Gorilla is done shaking the ITSM tree for now and is going to beat it’s chest in other verticals such as HR, Finance and Facilities etc. Let’s apply what we’ve learnt and use our ITSM logic in these other disciplines. I like the sentiment but I’m not convinced by the market definition. I’m not sure ServiceNow are either. Thank goodness.

“So is Service Relationship Management a new software “category” No. Or at least we think not. It’s just a term that ServiceNow is using to help customers think beyond ITSM”

Maybe we could just call it… err, IT? Have we not always done that? Let the good stuff permeate the enterprise based on solid reputation and successful execution against business outcomes, not silly definitions.

The Next Salesforce.com?

Business Insider touted ServiceNow as the next Salesforce.com. If Salesforce.com is aiming to own the mindshare of the CMO, ServiceNow has the opportunity to own the IT service delivery plumbing and mindshare of the CIO (or perhaps even COO if Bill gets his promotion). But they have plenty of competitors on their heels vying for this space.

For this journey ServiceNow will need to be a lot more ‘App’ and a lot less ‘Toolkit’. Market trends say Mr HR director wants to build and deploy his own solutions. Not get bored waiting for IT to deliver it. IT can own the plumbing, governance and can help automate but ultimately departments will want the freedom to do their own thing, building and fiddling themselves. Salesforce.com got there through the use of ‘Editions’ and converting their platform to a marketplace for niche apps to plug into.

Missing ITAM Savvy

As an ITAM specialist I was disappointed to see little mention in the roadmap around ITAM features, building on the first elements in Berlin. I look forward to looking at this in more depth. This is a significant hole in the ServiceNow portfolio.

The strategic partnership with BDNA can only be considered a short term band-aid unless it is truly embedded in the platform. BDNA have good content to offer but it’s not exactly aligned to the ‘Cloud IT Company’ rhetoric. The last time I looked at BDNA it required the install of an Oracle database and whole rack of kit to run it.

Salesforce.com swallowed up a small army of tech firms to bolster their current $26BN valuation and market dominance, I expect ServiceNow to do the same. Watch this space.

Images from Google Finance

Do you clog your social media channels with useless crap?

True value or ego massage? '64 % of the people sharing information from others to others did it to get attention, show friendship, show they have inside information, show humour...'
True value or ego massage? ’64 % of the people sharing information from others to others did it to get attention, show friendship, show they have inside information, show humour…’

Do you care what you share or clog your social media channels with useless crap?

In this article Tobias Nyberg explores why people share at all.

Sharing and caring

Is there a way to tell if what I’m sharing actually has any value to others? Do my followers, readers and community peers have any use for the information I share or am I guilty of clogging the social media channels with useless crap?

Out of the 239 twitter followers, 158 Facebook friends, 93 Google+ circlers, 343 LinkedIn connections I have, a very small percentage interact with me frequently when I share stuff with them. How can I tell that they and the ones that are silent find value in my contributions?

Is sharing caring or is it a way to feed my ego?

I asked myself, the Google+ Back2ITSM community and friends of mine this question some time ago since I wanted to try to understand if I bring any value to the community in these areas or if I should just stop spreading worthless information.

The answers were, of course, not simple or even all in the course of what I expected. And just to set some prerequisites straight, I wasn’t necessarily looking for hard fact metrics on value (even if it would be nice), a good feeling about the value takes me close enough.

There are some basic tell tails to see if you bring value through the social channels. If people follow you on twitter, have you in circles on Google+, friend or follow you on Facebook connect with you on LinkedIn they at least think that you at one point or another brought them value. The problem is of course that most people don’t un-follow, un-friend or un-circle you if you no longer bring any value. They’ll either ignore you or mute you from their streams.

Another thing is if your followers re-share your contributions, you would expect them to find your information valuable to them, and in some cases it probably is. But as it turns out, the main reason people share stuff from others, is to either look smart themselves or in other ways boost the image of them. (See also ‘Suffering with consumption‘)

An old study I found on how word of mouth advertising works is probably possible to apply on social media as well. At least for the sake of argument in this situation. That study shows that 64 % of the people sharing information from others to others did it to get attention, show friendship, show they have inside information, show humour, etc.

There is of course value in that, maybe just not the kind of value I was hoping to bring to the community.

Writing and sharing for your own sake

Some of the people I’ve spoken to about this says that they aren’t that interested in what value to others they contribute with. They write, share and interact for their own sake. And I guess that’s a perfectly fine standpoint as well. It can be a way to collect and sort out thoughts and ideas and put it into structure for use, now or later on. And if someone happens to read it and find it valuable, well, good for them. But will they continue to create and share content if no one ever uses it or find value in it?

Some people believe that value from what you contribute with will come out eventually, for someone, and you won’t probably even know it. So their strategy is to keep sharing what comes to mind (and perhaps what make them look smarter) and then let the information be valuable, or not. I guess that would be sharing without caring.

I’ve also been told that it’s impossible to know if you bring any value if you don’t know what your followers want and find value in. And that is a bit tricky to say the least when you don’t know them at all, or even know who they are besides a screen name.

One method that I’ve found to be more used than others is a pragmatic approach of loosely collecting vibes on the channels on what kind of value you bring. Most of us probably do that but some even have methods of sorts to create an perception or understanding on what social media channels to use because they bring more value (as well as gain more value as it turns out) to their followers. Some people write it down to track changes and to see their “vibe-trends” over time.

In the end, it seem to be hard to measure the value of what you share on social media and it’s hard to even create a perception of the value of your contributions to others. I think it’s safe to say that much of what many people share is valuable for ego boosting though, may it be mine or your ego.

When I share things with the community I would like to think I care about what I share and what the information bring in form of value. But to be frank, sometimes I share value and sometimes I share crap. But even more importantly, sometimes, quite often, I don’t share at all. Because I care what I share.